sourcedumal:

"I have gotten so many letters from girls and boys who were so excited and proud to see a Black woman performing one of their favorite characters, “Elphaba”, in the musical Wicked. I was in Wicked for nearly 2 and a half years and I learned so much during that time.. .it wasn’t always easy and I was so busy in my own experience of working at the Gershwin theatre that I didn’t truly imagine so many kids would be inspired.

"Oh, but the letters flew in, the artwork the fan sites, all the love that said "We’re so proud of you!" and "We can do it too!" I found out over the years that these things have meant alot to young people of color. "

- Actress Saycon Sengbloh, on being the first black ”Elphaba” in Wicked on Broadway.

YES

Avenger Black Widow is one of the best bets, as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent who has already proven herself on-screen, and with a spy skill set that can break superhero cinema out of the usual origin-story rut…But instead of being seen as powerful and dynamic characters who could lead their own films, a double standard is applied to superheroines. The men lead, and the women support, no matter how powerful their characters are. Marvel head Kevin Feige has actually repeatedly expressed happiness at how his company has handled female superheroes. He is perfectly happy to have the female characters support the men, rather than feel pressure over the company’s very recognizable exclusion of female stars: “I’m very proud of the way the Marvel movies handle the female characters […] as opposed to feeling the pressure of ‘When are you doing a female movie?’”

Intentional or not, Feige’s words express a palpable disinterest in the female superheroes audiences clearly want to see. In the same interview, he blows off the idea of a Black Widow solo movie with that same old standby: “If we had a great idea, we’d do it.”

The fact is that if Feige desired it, it would happen — and the Marvel head has a history of making his desires a reality. “It became a secret dream” of his “to have a second bite at the apple” when Hulk crashed and burned in 2003. In five short years, Bruce Banner was back for The Incredible Hulk — another film that missed the mark, before the character finally hit, four years later, when Mark Ruffalo took over in The Avengers. That time, Feige made it happen, and poor returns on Marvel’s investments didn’t stop him.


Monika Bartyzel, Girls on Film: Hollywood should stop pretending it’s hard to make a female superhero movie (via fuckyeahblackwidow)
fandomforequality:

Ladies Who Need More Love: Clara Webb (Byzantium)
Written by: L.S. Williams

It’s only towards the end of the movie that Clara’s motives start to be revealed to the audience, and because of this, she appears primarily as an antagonist. Somebody who manipulates and exploits, who treats her daughter badly, and who kills indiscriminately. However, as more of Clara’s story is revealed, it becomes clear that she is more than Eleanor believes her to be. She is a smart, strong, and even compassionate woman fighting against a sexist vampire ‘Order’ for the right of her and her daughter to not just to forge their own path, but also to simply exist.

Read the full article and join the discussion at Fandom For Equality

fandomforequality:

Ladies Who Need More Love: Clara Webb (Byzantium)

Written by: L.S. Williams

It’s only towards the end of the movie that Clara’s motives start to be revealed to the audience, and because of this, she appears primarily as an antagonist. Somebody who manipulates and exploits, who treats her daughter badly, and who kills indiscriminately. However, as more of Clara’s story is revealed, it becomes clear that she is more than Eleanor believes her to be. She is a smart, strong, and even compassionate woman fighting against a sexist vampire ‘Order’ for the right of her and her daughter to not just to forge their own path, but also to simply exist.

Read the full article and join the discussion at Fandom For Equality

i-shapebeauty:

Using film, visual art, dance and poetry, A Different Mirror provides a platform for Women of Colour artists to explore the conflicts about how we see ourselves versus how we are seen.

The 3 day exhibition and educational activities confront these crucial questions about the systems or structures that shape our relationship to our bodies and its connection to our identities. It holds up a mirror to see and know ourselves differently.

Exhibition Public Opening Times:

Saturday 26th April 2014 10 am – 5pm

Sunday 27th April 2014 12 pm – 5pm

 Featuring works by: Indigo WilliamsLesley AsareSanaa HamidNasreen RajaSarina Leah MantleWasma MansourUchenna Dance, Patricia Kaersenhout, and Ng’endo MukiiAowen JinJanine ‘j*9′ FrancoisClare Eluka, and Emerzy Corbin.

Reflections: Art as a Tool for Healing

Saturday 26th of April 2014

6:30pm – 8:30pm £7.50 (early bird £6.50)

This artist seminar explores the ways in which art can be used to heal and empower ourselves and others. It offers insight into different artistic mediums and how these artists have used their practices for reclamation and transformation.

Featuring a performance by writer Yrsa Daley-Ward, talks by Indigo Williams (poet) and Lesley Asare (visual and performance artist) of I Shape Beauty, and a panel discussion featuring Sharmila ChauhanAowen JinVicki Igbokwe (Uchenna Dance) and Bola Agbaje.

Book your ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/reflections-art-as-a-tool-for-healing-tickets-11083233249?ref=ebtnebtckt 

Photos by Rowena Gordon Photography

More TV viewers were drawn to shows with ethnically diverse casts and writers, while shows with less diversity in their credits attracted smaller audiences.

The new report documents a similar phenomenon in film: Those with a relatively high amount of minority involvement (21–30 percent) on screen posted the highest median global box office receipts ($160.1 million). In contrast, films with the least minority involvement (10 percent or less) posted much lower box office receipts ($68.5 million).

A new study out of UCLA proves that diversity sells in Hollywood, despite myths to the contrary. 

" [The studio] feel like ‘its just a movie’, and I’m like, you don’t get how many times this cat in Manila has watched this film and been inspired and felt like he could do anything, just because you ignited a little flame with one little sequence that lasted a couple of seconds, that made him feel he could. Its about this idea that you can get out of where you are if you just perpetuate a joy that takes you somewhere." [x]

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

"Too often we see female characters pitted against each other for jobs or for men. While the ladies on Brooklyn Nine-Nine are certainly competitive, they do not tear each other down or view each other as rivals. [They] are all wildly different characters, but they come together to support each other as friends and colleagues." (x)