When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

"Too often we see female characters pitted against each other for jobs or for men. While the ladies on Brooklyn Nine-Nine are certainly competitive, they do not tear each other down or view each other as rivals. [They] are all wildly different characters, but they come together to support each other as friends and colleagues." (x)

New study puts numbers to the lack of minority representation in film

siddharthasmama:

wordsforstrangers:

Excerpts from full study:

Prevalence. Across 100 top-grossing films of 2012, only 10.8% of speaking characters are Black, 4.2% are Hispanic, 5% are Asian, and 3.6% are from other (or mixed race) ethnicities. Just over three-quarters of all speaking characters are White (76.3%). These trends are relatively stable, as little deviation is observed across the 5-year sample. 

We also look at the total percentage of Black speaking characters per film in 2012. Almost 40% of all 2012 movies portray Black characters as less than 5% of the speaking cast. Only 9% of films show Black characters as 12-14.9% of the cast, which dovetails the 2012 US Census percentage (13.1%). A full 70% of the 2012 films feature Black characters in a percentage below that of the US Census. 

The percentages of female speaking characters who are Hispanic (33.9%), Black (34.6%), and Asian (34.8%) are greater than the percentages of White females (28.8%) and females from other ethnicities (16.1%). Although we see more women from certain racial/ethnic categories, compared to their male counterparts, females in every group are still under represented. 

Portrayal. Hispanic females (41.1%, 39.3%) are more likely to be depicted in sexy attire and partially naked than Black (31.8%, 30.5%) or White females (32.8%, 32.3%). Asian females (15.7%, 15.7%) are far less likely to be sexualized. Domestic roles did not vary for females by race/ethnicity, but differences emerged for males. Hispanic males are more likely to be depicted as fathers and relational partners than males in all other racial/ethnic groups. Black males, on the other hand, are the least likely to be depicted in these roles. 

Behind the Camera. Across 565 directors of the top-grossing films from 2007-2012, only 33 (5.8%) are Black. This translates into a ratio of over 16 non Black directors working to every 1 Black director. There are only 2 Black females who directed a film across the 500 movies in the sample. Some of the sample films are helmed by the same individual. Counting directors only once, 22 unique Black directors appear across the 500-film sample. 

When a non Black director helms a picture, only 9.9% of the on screen speaking characters are Black. When a Black director is in this leadership role, 52.6% of all speaking characters on screen are Black. This represents a 42.7% increase.

Here you go, all you fact checkers and number lovers - it’s right here for you, presented nice and neat in percentages and figures so you can see what we are always trying to get you to understand through our own words.

heisenfox:

If you’re not watching Sirens on Thursday nights at 10pm on USA, then you’re missing out. Not only is it one of the funniest shows out there right now — being that it’s co-created and executive produced by Denis Leary — but it’s also highly inclusive.

It centers on a team of Chicago EMTs, and focuses on the odd partnership of three men, Brian, who is the new guy, Johnny, a guy with a slow developing emotional range, and Hank, an African-American homosexual who defies all stereotypes the rest of popular media inflicts upon gay men. Their team is fleshed out in Cash, Voodoo, and Stats. And last night’s episode showed that Voodoo is asexual.

It took Brian from confusion and denail, to attempts to understand, and eventually wrapped it all around in a bow of acceptance. Brian went from the ideology that asexuals “just haven’t had proper sex,” to wanting to understand what asexual means — and failing — and finally all the way to realizing that sex isn’t what defines relationships, and that just being around Voodoo is enough for him.

Do yourselves a favor, and catch up on the episodes, and start tuning in Thursdays at 10.

fandomforequality:

Ladies Who Need More Love: Rae Earl (My Mad Fat Diary)
Written by: Sam F.

My Mad Fat Diary not only has a female protagonist, but she practically overthrows all of the tropes that media typically believes female leading ladies should follow. Rae Earl [Sharon Rooney] is a 16-year-old girl struggling with mental health issues stemming from self-esteem and body image problems[…]My Mad Fat Diary isn’t a Cinderella story, as most series with “ugly duckling” leads eventually turn out to be. There is no magical moment where Rae goes on a diet, gets a makeover, and suddenly becomes the most popular girl in school.

Read the full article and join the discussion at Fandom For Equality

fandomforequality:

Ladies Who Need More Love: Rae Earl (My Mad Fat Diary)

Written by: Sam F.

My Mad Fat Diary not only has a female protagonist, but she practically overthrows all of the tropes that media typically believes female leading ladies should follow. Rae Earl [Sharon Rooney] is a 16-year-old girl struggling with mental health issues stemming from self-esteem and body image problems[…]My Mad Fat Diary isn’t a Cinderella story, as most series with “ugly duckling” leads eventually turn out to be. There is no magical moment where Rae goes on a diet, gets a makeover, and suddenly becomes the most popular girl in school.

Read the full article and join the discussion at Fandom For Equality

fandomforequality:

And the Oscar went to…

Written by: Katie Labovitz

But the Academy Awards are supposed to be about bestowing awards on the people whose contribution to film (onscreen or off) showcased the best in the industry. Throughout the Oscar’s 86-year history, hundreds of filmmakers have been honored for their work. This year’s ceremony stood out because of the diversity of its recipients and the subject matter of the films on which they worked.

Read the entire article and join the discussion at Fandom For Equality

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ F → feminism & representation
"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)